January 19, 2014

Fun, free, and neat construction project on a winter day~


A very big part of my life is my 18thc. house and very early antiques, and they have been for many years. I have worked on restoring my period home for over 16 years now, and been a dealer of antiques as well as a collector for many, many more years than that. This blog was to have featured these loves more prominently, and in the future it will, with more posts relating to our DIY and collecting/salvaging adventures.
I have also always had little money to spend on antiques, home decor, etc., and have long been a bargain hunter with champagne taste on a beer budget. I actually enjoy it, because I get a lot of satisfaction from waiting and planning for something I've wanted and getting a fantastic piece for a bargain as a result of my own efforts at antique hunting and my knowledge from long years of studying history and early pieces.  I have also loved my many years of salvaging and building or making other things for a little money or for free and then having them become a cherished addition to my home.
Yesterday Adam and I made a wall shelf for above the fireplace in our keeping room using 250 year old boards salvaged for free from the old cape on Nichols road that was torn down recently.
The boards we used had original feathered or beveled edges, and we planned and constructed the wall shelf to show these at the front of the piece. The color and patina are completely original; we added NO stain, sealer, etc.
Total cost: 0
We had a fun morning making this together, and it is now mounted on the chimney breast, and holds a few of our 17thc. treasures. I am sharing some of the pictures here but you can see all of them right now on the TOUR PAGE of our website.
Probably the best compliment we have received was from our friend John, who has been a restoration contractor specializing in working on early homes for over 30 years. He peered at it up close and said he would never in a million years think that our shelf was anything less than at least 250 years old!

Another little project I did by myself this week was to remove the linsey woolsey canopy from atop our 17thc. English tester bed, and now you can really see the gorgeous paneled tester. (The canopy had been on the reproduction 18thc. bed I had for years before Adam and I found our 17thc. original).

Using old brass curtain rods and a few cup hooks I had in the attic, I made up my own somewhat clever (I thought), way to re-hang the heavy tapestry bed curtains in a subtle way that enhances the original dark wood tester of our bed.




  Take an updated pictorial tour of our home HERE






 You can see all the photos of our period home, our projects, antiques for sale, etc. on our WEBSITE~


10 comments:

  1. I canNOT wait for the day that Patty and I can come and visit! I so want to see your beautiful cape house and meet you and Adam in person!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I just love, love your home and all the little touches. Just seeing the pictures bring a smile to me and a tiny bit of envy! Here in Idaho we do not have any wonderful homes such as yours.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I just love your home and all the wonderful little touches you bring to it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Everything looks so great. I love your Tudor pies. Maybe you should do an online tutorial or teach a class at UNH regarding cookery of the times. I bet you would be fabulous!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Just awesome, as usual :-)
    What's hanging under the self? Borlotti beans drying?
    Do you have a recipe to share for a standing pie crust? I've used the one I found on savoringthepast.net
    ( http://miriaminmaailma.blogspot.fi/2013/06/itsestaan-seisova-piirakka.html )

    ReplyDelete
  6. Total cost of 0 (whatever the currency) is my favorite. too!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your last couple of posst have been so wonderful for this otherwise gloomy time of year - so inspiring. Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  8. love your blog and am waiting for some new posts!! how have you made it through this very very cold winter? we think of you up there in cold new England and hope you are doing fine!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Just stumbled upon your blog! I love historical clothing, houses, history of how people lived, especially the 18th century; the 17th and 16th century also really fascinate me as well. I am in awe and was hoping I could come across a couple/family that lives in an older era in this modern time, as I have seen many shows that show people that live their life in the 1950s, 1940s or 1930s style including their house and clothes, but I never came across anyone who has lived in an older time period like this, so glad to have found it by coming across your blog! I wish I could live in a historically accurate 18th century house and wear period clothing all the time, but its real expensive, I bought a few 18th century dress patterns from JP Ryan Patterns, but feel a bit intimidated by how hard it is to sew a period dress. It is so inspiring to see how you and your husband could bargain hunt, collect things one by one over the years, and get some things free by making it yourself with what you could find.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Just stumbled upon your blog! I love historical clothing, houses, history of how people lived, especially the 18th century. The 17th and 16th century also really fascinate me as well and our my second favorite time periods after the 18th century. I was hoping I could come across a couple/family that lives in an older era in this modern time, as I have seen many shows that show people that live their life in the 1950s, 1940s or 1930s style including their house and clothes, but I never came across anyone who has lived in an older time period like this, so I am glad to have found it by coming across your blog! I wish I could live in a historically accurate 18th century house and wear period clothing all the time, but its real expensive, I bought a few 18th century dress patterns from JP Ryan Patterns, but feel a bit intimidated by how hard it is to sew period clothing. I would also like to get some 17th and 16th century patterns sometime soon. It is so inspiring to see how you and your husband could bargain hunt, collect things one by one over the years, and get some things free by making it yourself with what you could find.

    ReplyDelete